Have you ever stumbled up on a case where Facebook is showing you a potential reach of 2.7M and then reaching a 1.8 Frequency on only 7900 impressions? Regardless of the how great your ads are performing.

This is a case happened to one of my clients

 
You see:

From the data, Facebook has shown the ads nearly TWO times to each person “in the chosen audience”.

The problem is this:

There is only 7900 impressions on a 2.7 million person audience…

How’s that possible and what does it have to do with scaling?

It comes down to understanding the Facebook ads algorithm…

Here’s how it works:

When you select “conversions” as your campaign objective…

You’re effectively telling Facebook to look at the audience you’re targeting…

And you’re giving Facebook permission to show the ads ONLY to those they think will convert for you.

They base this off a LOT of data:

Your account history…

Your ad history…

The performance of your ad in the learning phase…

And other black box factors…

Depending on those things, Facebook will determine who they are going to show your ads to…

And they’re REALLY good at it!

So in this case (and this is REALLY common), Facebook basically said:

We think only about 4000 people out of this 2.7 million audience will convert in this particular case…

So we’re going to keep showing your ads to those people…

That’s why his frequency is nearly 2 already…

IF you were to try and scale this campaigns EVEN THOUGH ITS WORKING RIGHT NOW…

It will surely go to hell as soon as he raises the budget…

Because Facebook will be FORCED to extend his ads to people who they think will NOT convert…

And they won’t!

Which will drive up his CPA and erode out most, if not all, of the profit!!!!

I see this every single day.

So if you’re doing the same thing we show cased here and you’re having trouble scaling…

Now you know why!

I help my clients fix these issues and generate 300%-900% ROAS with their ad campaigns.

Is that something you want?

See if you qualify here: http://bit.ly/HNConsultation

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